Care to hear some superb and haunting poetry? (Audio selections from Dennis Villelmi’s “Fretensis”)

I am honored today to share with you three recordings of me reading from Dennis Villelmi’s Fretensis: In the Image of a Blind God.  The Bees Are Dead has graciously published the readings over at its website; you can find them right here.

Thank you, Dennis, for allowing me to interpret your outstanding poetic work.

 

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Don’t bee a stranger …

… stop on over at The Bees Are Dead for the latest in dystopian prose, poetry, art and photography.  Most recently, B.A.D. has featured the outstanding work of poets such as Jake TringaliPaul BrookesAllison Grayhurst and David Spicer.

See you there.

 

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Credit: By ADBGVA (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Bee afraid, bee very afraid …

If you’re looking for a way to spend a lazy Sunday evening, then stop over at The Bees Are Dead for the best in dystopian poetry, prose, art and photography.

There’s some haunting poetry by Jonathan May and Jon Bennett, as well as some stark, vivid photography of abandoned buildings by Kathryn Nee.

 

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Credit: By ADBGVA (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Dennis Villelmi interviews the Woman in Room 237!

If you are a horror fan, you’re in for a rare treat.  Stop over at The Bees Are Dead to read Dennis Villelmi’s interview with Lia Beldam, who portrayed the woman in Room 237 in Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s “The Shining.”  (Fans of the 1977 novel and its 2013 sequel, “Doctor Sleep,” may recognize the character as the ghost of Lorraine Massey.)

Dennis chatted with Ms. Beldam about a few different aspects of filming — including her experiences with Kubrick and Jack Nicholson.  It’s great stuff.

 

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“Operation Staffhound,” by Philippe Atherton-Blenkiron

Hey, gang — if you missed its appearance last week over at The Bees Are Dead, here is the audio for my reading of Philippe Atherton-Blenkiron’s “Operation Staffhound.”  The poem is from his superb 2014 dystopian science fiction novel in poetry format, “The Pustoy.”

“Operation Staffhound” describes the brutal domestic police force employed by Lev Solokov, the future dictator of Britain and the novel’s central antagonist.

 

“Operation Staffhound,” by Philippe Atherton-Blenkiron (read by Eric Robert Nolan)

I’m happy today to be able to share The Bees Are Dead’s release of my audio recording of “Operation Staffhound,” by Philippe Atherton-Blenkiron.  This truly excellent poem is an excerpt from his 2014 dystopian novel in verse format, “The Pustoy.”  (I quite positively reviewed the book both here at the blog and over at Amazon, where it can be purchased — “Operation Staffhound” might be my favorite poem in the complete work.)

“The Pustoy” is a particularly dark science fiction epic that imagines a genocidal dictator, Lev Solokov, ruling a nightmarish future Britain.  The brutal “Staffhounds” are his fascist foot-soldiers in the streets.

I had great fun reading the poem.  I’m grateful to Philippe for allowing me to interpret it, and to The Bees Are Dead for sharing my recording with its audience:

Philippe Atherton-Blenkiron’s “Operation Staffhound” at The Bees Are Dead

 

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Today is the first day of Autumn.  Why not stop over at The Bees Are Dead, and mark the encroaching cold with a few dark futuristic visions?

There you’ll find Gary Glauber’s “After the Deluge”, which is a sanguine twist on the usual narrative of the post-apocalyptic poem.  There is also some truly arresting photography — Paul Gerrard’s “Monochromatic Beginnings” is shudder-inducing and delightfully monstrous, and Kathryn Nee’s ““Windows into the End” is a haunting exhibition of abandonment art.

 

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